A Product Manager Learns to Code: Week 10

I finished the Javascript chapter by waking up at 4:45am Thursday morning. I've been increasingly busy at work and thus I've been falling even more behind. There were a series of six intense coding quizzes on functions and loops in order to finish the Objects chapter, and I got them all done before 7am on Thursday.

I still feel like I need a lot more practice in JavaScript. I’m going to continue with my Codecademy course as a review + additional practice with basic JavaScript principles. I know I need more practice writing functions.

 Sometimes, ya gotta wake up at 4:45am to get it done.

Sometimes, ya gotta wake up at 4:45am to get it done.

Starting with jQuery, the Udacity course launched immediately into talking about “The DOM”  and “manipulating the DOM”  and “DOM elements” and I was like “DEAR GOD WILL SOMEONE PLEASE TELL ME WHAT DOM IS?!”

(I now know what DOM is but this wasn't explained clearly in the beginning of the jQuery chapter.)

What I Learned This Week: 

  1. Via the Codecademy course, I learned that there is new syntax (in the most recent JavaScript version) for outputs using ` and ${} instead of appending everything with +, and this makes it wayyy easier to print outputs. EX: instead of using + operator
    1. console.log(“My name is” + “myName” + “ . My favorite City is “ + “myCity.”) <— this is sooooo tedious.
    2. you can use the new syntax supported in the most recent version of JavaScript:  console.log(`My name is ${myName}. My favorite city is ${myCity}.`) <— waaaaay less tedious!
  2. Public Service Announcement: jQuery is just a JavaScript library. I may have known this… but I’m not sure that I knew this. JQuery can’t exist on it’s own. It’s just JavaScript. 
     
  3. I've head the term “DOM manipulation” when talking to front end teams (especially at Spectrum), but now I realize what this is and is specific to jQuery.
     
  4. The DOM is a data structure, like a tree. Elements nested inside each other in the DOM are children. Elements at the same level are siblings, and so on.

Accomplishments

  1. Finishing the JavaScript chapter! I haven’t had as much time to dedicate lately, and I feel way behind, even though I’ve finished JavaScript.The six finishing coding quizzes were hard, and I have to admit, I needed the scholarship forums' help a few times to get through them all.
 I ran out of results on Shutterstock for "woman programming" so this week's image features a man! Disclaimer: I am not the human pictured.

I ran out of results on Shutterstock for "woman programming" so this week's image features a man! Disclaimer: I am not the human pictured.

Ah-Ha Moment(s)

  1. I think I might prefer the Codecademy format to Udacity. I might use both in tandem as I move forward after the scholarship.

    I really like how Codecadmy has quick learning exercises and quizzes, and follows up with short, "real-life" projects. If I have 30 minutes, I can really knock out a few exercises in Codecademy and feel accomplished, whereas I might not even finish a quiz in Udacity.

    It's just a different format. In general, Codecademy feels more 'gamified.'
     
  2. Also - Codecademy is super affordable. Udacity has a pricing structure where you pay for the entire (multi-month) program, whereas with Codeacdemy you can pay for month-to-month. Both are affordable, but Codecademy is seriously affordable.

    Udacity's pricing structure incentivizes students complete an entire course and have a solid understanding of a specific set of skills. Udacity used to (and still may for some programs) refund 50% of tuition upon completion of their nanodegree programs. Clearly, the goal is to make sure students finish the entire program, not just dabble.

    Both pricing structures have their merits, but Codecademy's is great if you're not sure how much time you'll be able to dedicate month-to-month. In my case, this pricing structure is great right now, because my work schedule is chaotic and may change.
 This is Codecademy's pricing structure. $20 a month is extremely reasonable for an awesome learn-to-code platform. I really like the format of Codecademy.

This is Codecademy's pricing structure. $20 a month is extremely reasonable for an awesome learn-to-code platform. I really like the format of Codecademy.